Mexican War Veterans of Peoria County

 

Here are a few tombstones of Mexican War Veterans
that I have found so far. If you have any pictures
that you would like to share,
please email me anytime!

Thank you kindly!

 


John H. Dixon is buried in the Elmwood Township Cemetery


John Taylor is buried in the Elmwood Township Cemetery


Darius S. Wiley is buried in the Elmwood Township Cemetery
 


(Excerpt from the History of Peoria County, Illinois, 1880, pages 352-359, submitted by Janine Crandell)

IN THE MEXICAN WAR.

     In 1846 the United States became involved in a war with Mexico. There had been nothing to disturb the tranquillity of the country since the Black Hawk troubles of 1832. Another generation of young men had come to the front, and the prospect of a brush with Mexico offered a little excitement and a change from the quiet routine of farm and shop life — an excitement peculiarly relishable to the average American.
     The army of the West was organized under the administration of President Polk in 1846, with the object of conquering New Mexico and California. In organizing this army, a call was made on Illinois for — regiments. As in the call for six regiments under President Lincoln's proclamation for seventy-five thousand men for three months at the beginning of the great American rebellion, more men were offered than could be accepted. Colonel May, of this county, raised a company and mustered in Peoria preparatory to starting for the place of rendezvous, but just before the hour fixed for leaving, he received notice that his company could not be accepted, so his men marched home again.
     The women at that time, as before and since, were full of patriotic ardor, and gave their influence to the encouragement of enlistments. And about the time Colonel May's company was advertised to muster at Peoria to start for Mexico, a number of them assembled at the residence of Mrs. —— Gray, now living at 105 North Monroe street, and made a handsome silk flag for presentation to the company. Among the number engaged in that work was Mrs. —— Tobes,[deceased] and her daughter ——, now Mrs. ——, and living in Chicago; Mrs. —— Morsman,[deceased] Mrs. William Dodge, still living in Peoria; Mrs. —— Armstrong, librarian Peoria Mercantile Library; Miss —— Pickett ;[deceased] Mrs. Isaac Underhill.

"BOUND TO BE A SOLDIER."


     D. C. Frazer, one of the present justices of the peace in Peoria, was then a young man, full of impetuosity and military ardor, and couldn't wait the movements of Colonel May's company organization. He hurried away to Pekin to join a company being raised in that county by Captain E. Jones, which was fortunate enough to be accepted. That company was mustered in as Company G, of Colonel E. D. Baker's Fourth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Frazer enlisted in June, 1846; and was mustered out at New Orleans in June, 1847.

MEXICAN VETERANS.

     There came with the tide of immigration to Peoria and vicinity, quite a number of men who had taken part in the Mexican war, and as year was added to year, these veterans fell in with each other, and it was only natural that a deep-seated and warm­hearted friendship should spring up between them, notwithstanding they were sons of different States, had been members of different companies and different regiments and that they had never seen each other until their chance meetings at Peoria. In 1874 it was found there was quite a number of these heroes residing in Peoria county—almost enough of them to form a full regulation company—and it was determined to form themselves into a society to be known as the

CENTRAL ILLINOIS ASSOCIATION OF MEXICAN VETERANS.

     The first meeting of the members of this association was held at the Peoria courthouse, September 8, 1874. S. O. White presided, and D. C. Frazer acted as scribe. Messrs. Bush, Frazer and Drury were appointed a committee on resolutions and to secure excursion rates for the delegates chosen by the veterans then in session to represent them in the State Convention of their old comrades at Bloomington on the 23d and 24th. Comrades Heinike, Hurt, Drury, White, Frazer, Sheppard and Sullivan were appointed as such delegates.

     Resolved, That the surviving soldiers and sailors, of the Mexican War residing in this and adjoining counties organize themselves into a society for further re-unions for social purposes and to consider their claims on the government for a pension.

     The second meeting of which there is any record, was held on the 18th of May, 1876, S. 0. White presiding. At this meeting, on motion of R. W. Burt, the name of "Central Illinois Association of Veterans of the Mexican War," was adopted. Messrs. R. W. Burt, J. W. McKenzie and John Daily were appointed a committee to prepare a constitution and by-laws for the government of the association. The first permanent officers were:
     President, Samuel O. White; recording secretary, D. C. Frazer; corresponding secretary, J. W. McKenzie; treasurer, R. W. Burt.
     R. W. Gilliam, of Chillicothe, was chosen to represent the association at the Philadelphia Convention of Mexican War veterans.

CONSTITUTION.

     The report of the committee on constitution and by-laws was submitted to a meeting of the association, June 15, 1876, which was read, amended and adopted.
     Article 1. This organization shall be known as the "Central Illinois Association of Veterans of the Mexican War," and may include any honorably discharged soldier or sailor who served in the Mexican war.
     Art. 2. This association shall hold its regular meetings on the first Thursday in January, April, July and October of each year; and special meetings may be called at such times and places as the President may deem necessary.
     Art. 3. The object of this association shall be to gather the veterans of the Mexican war, in the central part of Illinois, into a fraternal brotherhood, for the promotion of pleasant intercourse and good fellowship, and to further the interests of its members.
     Art. 4. The officers of this association shall be President, Vice-President, Treasurer, Secretary, and Corresponding Secretary.
     Art. 5. The officers shall be chosen by a vote of the members present at the annual meetings in January, and continue in office one year, and until their successors are elected.
     Art. 6. Any person may become a member by giving the President and Secretary satisfactory evidence that he was a soldier or sailor in the Mexican war, and was honorably discharged, on the payment of fifty cents admission fee, and twenty-five cents at each regular meeting.
     Art. 7. No assessment shall be made on members for ordinary expenses, except by a two-thirds vote of all present.
     Art. 8. No amendments shall be made to this constitution except at a regular meeting, and by a two-thirds vote.

BY-LAWS.

     Art. 1. The duties of the officers of this association shall be such as usually devolve upon officers of similar associations.
     Art. 2. The business of this association shall be conducted in accordance with the usages of legislative bodies in the United States.
     Art. 3. A majority of the members present at any regular meeting, may alter or amend these by-laws.

HON. JAMES SHIELDS.

     At a meeting of the association held at the office of D. C. Frazer on the 29th of June, 1876, a letter from General Shields was read, requesting recognition as an honorary member of the association. The request was granted, and the name of that hero of many a hotly contested battlefield, was added to the membership.

FLAG PRESENTATION.


     The Mexican veterans met at the Chamber of Commerce, July 4, 1876, on which occasion a fine United States flag was presented, with a few appropriate remarks, by Mrs. Hattie Milliken, a sister of Comrade D. C. Frazer. The presentation was responded to by Captain R. W. Burt, who received the flag in behalf of the association, after which the veterans joined the Centennial celebration, in a large wagon drawn by four horses, and beautifully decorated with American and Mexican flags, mottoes, portraits, etc.
     Regular meetings of the association have been held at the times named in the constitution, and called or special meetings whenever the interest of the veterans demanded. Communication is maintained with other organizations of the same kind in different parts of the State. Congressmen and Senators are constantly reminded that there was a war with Mexico, and that the surviving soldiers of that war are as deserving of pension recognition as the soldiers of any other war. Most of them are poor — many of them almost needy. As one of them expressed it to the writer, "there is hardly one of them that could buy a horse and buggy if needed." In some instances this association has had to provide for sick members, and in many other ways see to the wants of their comrades, all of which would be obviated if the government of the United States would deal justly by them and grant them that pension to which they feel they are justly entitled.

GRAND REUNION.

     At a meeting of the association, April 18,1878, it was resolved to have a grand public reunion at Peoria on the 23d of May, the arrangements for which were perfected under the management of a committee composed of Messrs. Henry Shofe, D. C. Frazer, W. F. Gardner, C. McKenzie, William Shroeder, Captain A. Stuber, of Chillicothe, and Major George A. Wilkins, of Dunlap Station.
     The reunion was one of the most interesting gatherings ever witnessed in Central Illinois. Captain R. W. Burt, an Ohio soldier in the Mexican war, and President of the association, officiated as President of the day, and Captain Adam Stuber, an old veteran of the Fifteenth U. S. Regulars, acted as Chief Marshal.
     An unexpectedly large number of veterans were present, and the citizens and volunteer soldiers of Peoria and vicinity united cordially in doing honor to the surviving soldiers of the struggle with Mexico. It was a source of regret that Gen. Shields failed to arrive, as had been expected, on the previous day. A committee of reception, escorted by a band and Capt. Taylors company (National Blues), with a large concourse of citizens, were present at the depot on the arrival of the train; but the General, through an unfortunate combination of circumstances, failed to arrive. He did come, however, a few hours later, and was serenaded at his hotel, where he held a reception.
     The morning of the 28d was stormy, but before noon, as if in recognition of the deserts of the veterans, the clouds dispersed and the afternoon was all that could be desired.
     The exercises were held at Jefferson Park, in the northern part of the city, and were very largely attended.
     Hon. M. C. Quinn, on behalf of the Association and citizens of Peoria, delivered the address of welcome, and the honor could not have been delegated to any one more competent.

QUINN'S WORDS OF WELCOME.
 

Ladies, Soldiers and Citizens:
     The committee of arrangements for this occasion has honored me by selecting me to extend a hearty greeting to all the representatives here of the heroes who upheld our flag upon foreign battle fields, and all others present, to do honor to the occasion, especially to one of the most distinguished of that warrior band, General James Shields. To you, one and all, survivors of the noble men who upheld our flag in Mexico, find the good men and true who fought under its folds to put down domestic violence, and to all the friends and admirers of such, I extend the most earnest and heartfelt welcome. I congratulate you upon this reunion of the survivors of the "Old Guards." And in expressing this welcome, I express not only the sentiments of the committee of arrangements, but also the sentiments of all the good people of this city and vicinity. This truth is clearly exemplified by the action of the public authorities on yesterday, by the mayor and council of this city, the board of supervisors and county officers, going in their official capacity, accompanied by our local soldiery, the "boys in blue." and thousands of our citizens to welcome our distinguished guest — a man whose name is a synonym for valor and patriotism — General Shields. If any thing more were wanting to express the feelings our people in this regard, it has been furnished by the action of our courts, which have adjourned to be with us on this occasion, and to hear Judge Shields.
     Survivors of the brave men who bore that flag from the Rio Grande to the City of Mexico, and planted it triumphantly over the halls of the Montezumas, you are worthy of this ovation ! Worthy — thrice worthy — are you of this ovation, noble hero and victim of Cerro Gordo. Of all the men whom, today, we delight to honor, foremost stands the aged veteran who has laughed at death upon hundreds of battle fields. General Shields. He is not old enough, however, to "Shoulder his crutch and show how fields are won," but young enough to gird on his sword at his country's call and shout forward, march, to victory. It is true that, like Cincinnatus, he has converted his sword into a plow share, but at this moment, if his country requires it, he is ready to turn that plow share into a sword, and wield it vigorously for the country for which he has so often given his blood.
     General Shields is still on the muster rolls! He is ready for duty! He can not be retired as long as his heart is warm and his eye is bright, he can never retire from the service of his country, if that country needs his services.

HISTORY OF PEORIA COUNTY.

     Politicians may retire — aye, must retire—General Shields will not, can not retire, for no man living has a larger place in the hearts of the people today than he. Despite the politicians the people will honor him, and in death his memory will be held in benediction.
     In conclusion, I extend to our distinguished guest, to the veterans and citizens from abroad, to each and all who honor the occasion, a hearty welcome.

THE MEXICAN WAR REVIEWED — ADDRESS OF GEN. LEONARD F. ROSS.

     After these generous and eloquent words of welcome, General Leonard F. Ross, of Avon, Fulton county, who had been selected for the occasion, spoke as follows:


Mr. President, Comrades of the Mexican War, Ladies and Gentlemen:
     It is now near the third of a century since the American soldiers gave their services to their country in the war with Mexico — since they encountered the trials and vicissitudes incident to army life in a foreign country, in an uncongenial and malarious climate. Since those services were rendered a full generation has entered upon and passed off the stage of action. And yet it seems but yesterday since we were electrified by the announcement that an armed foe had entered our territory and shed the "blood of American citizens on American soil" — since the brilliant victories of General Taylor on the Rio Grande floated o'er the wires. The details of the battles of Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma, and the gallant defense of Fort Brown were on every tongue. They occupied the minds of our entire people and filled all of the newspapers of the day. No event, probably, since the engagements at Lexington and Concord had so wrought up and agitated the American people.
     At a time when at peace, with all the world, before a collision was even expected by the mass of the country, we were precipitated into a war. The surprise, the astonishment at such an event, can at this distant day be scarcely imagined. And yet, perhaps, we should not have been taken so by surprise had we fully considered some preceding events in the history of the youngest member of our sisterhood of States — then the youngest and most feeble, but now the strong and vigorous, the rapidly growing young State of Texas. In this connection I deem it not inappropriate to refer cursorily to a few of the leading events that preceded the war between American republics.
     As early as 1835, Texas had revolted against the Mexican government and attempted independence. On the 2d of March, 1836, Texas declared her independence, adopted a constitution and organized a State government. For nine years this independence was maintained by force of arms, and was acknowledged by the government and other leading powers. Twice during this time Mexico made attempts to re-conquer Texas, but both times her forces were driven from the State. On the 1st of March, 1845, the United States Congress passed a joint resolution declaring that certain territory therein named "rightfully belonged to the Republic of Texas," and that it might be erected into a State, called the State of Texas. On the 4th of July, 1845, Texas assented to the terms of this resolution, and became a State in the American Union.
     During this time Mexico continued to issue her proclamations and pronunciamentos, and threatening to conquer Texas. In order to protect this new State, General Taylor was ordered to move with his forces to the southern frontier of Texas. While thus occupying the country, on the 24th of April, 1846, General Arista crossed over the Rio Grande with a large Mexican force and surrounded a small detachment of sixty-three United States dragoons, killed about one-fourth, and took the balance prisoners.
     Large bodies of Mexican troops were soon after crossed over the Rio Grande, both above and below the encampment of General Taylor, threatening his depot supplies at Point Isabel and his communication therewith. In order to protect these and save his little army of 4,000 men from destruction, he met the Mexican army of 6,000 and defeated it in two pitched battles. Having left detached portions of his command for the defense of Fort Brown and Point Isabel, the battles of Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma were fought with a force of 2,300, and the enemy in both instances selected the battlefield. These battles, fought on the 8th and 9th of May, 1846, were the beginning of the war with Mexico.
     On the 13th of May, Congress declared that a state of war existed "by the act of the Republic of Mexico." On the 23d of the same month, Mexico made an open declaration of war against the United States. Then came the call for 50,000 volunteers, which was answered by a tender of the services of over 300,000. Then followed the mustering in of troops, the hurrying forward of men and supplies, the collection of arms, ammunition, provisions, and transportation for a large army, and the excitement that ever attends the organization and equipment of military forces. On the Rio Grande, the Summer of 1846 was mostly spent in preparation, but the fortified city of Monterey was assaulted and taken by General Taylor in September, when defended by troops doubling the number of the assailants. About the same time General Kearney hoisted the American flag in New Mexico, and established a new government.
     The year 1846 was further signalized by the operations of Commodores Sloat and Stockton and Captain Fremont on the Pacific coast, the brilliant marches of Colonel Doniphan and General Kearney. the capture of Tampico by Commodore Perry, and its occupation by General Shields, and the occupation of Victoria by Generals Taylor and Patterson. General Scott having arrived in Mexico to take command of the armies about the 1st of January, 1847, the first movement of troops were those of Generals Taylor and Patterson from Victoria; the first northward to his old quarters at Monterey, General Patterson south to Tampico, to join General Scott in his operations against Vera Cruz; Taylor to gain fresh laurels at Buena Vista, and Patterson to become second in command in the reduction of Vera Cruz and the castle of San Juan D'Ulloa, which, after two weeks' investment, surrendered to the artillery of General Scott and his subordinates with the least possible loss.
     Vera Cruz taken, now commences the march for the interior, the "halls of the Montezumas," from the same starting point, and over the same route taken by Cortez over three hundred years before. But this march was to be no holiday affair. The capital of the Mexican republic was not to be gained on " flowery beds of ease." Some severe fighting has first to be done. Santa Anna, although defeated at Buena Vista, has had near two months to reorganize his army. Collecting a force of 15,000 men, he intrenches himself on the heights of Cerro Gordo, and prepares to dispute our passage. Bu notwithstanding his defensive preparations, notwithstanding the numerous proclamations and pronunciamentos fulminated by him against the "Northern Barbarians" and the "ruthless invaders of Mexican homes," three weeks after the surrender of Vera Cruz with its 5,000 prisoners, 400 pieces of ordnance, its numerous forts and the renowned castle of San Juan D'Ulloa, three weeks after this valuable and most bloodless victory, the American army is pushed forward and hurled against the fortifications of Cerro Gordo, assaulting this stronghold in front, flank and rear at the same time. Before twelve o'clock the heights are taken, with 3,000 prisoners, 10,000 fugitives are in rapid retreat towards Jalapa, pursued by about 400 of General Shields' brigade, who, after the fall, and as was supposed the mortal wound of their commander (General Shields), were led by Colonel Baker half way to the gates of Jalapa, Cerro Gordo simply added one more to the list of continuous victories gained by our army since the beginning of hostilities.
     Without following our army through its two years of marches and engagements with the enemy, and making mention of all the battles fought and victories gained—in a word, I may say that from Vera Cruz to the City of Mexico, in every engagement and battle, our army was victorious. It has, I believe, been truthfully said that no other army in the world's history ever fought so great a number of battles against such vastly superior numbers, and in every engagement, without exception, won a decided and brilliant victory.
     And why was it so? Why was the American army uniformly successful against such vast odds? The Mexicans used to try to solve this question. Various theories were advanced on the subject. They always contended that their troops were better drilled and disciplined than ours, and why they did not at any time ever meet with success was a mystery they could not solve. Had the Mexicans known something of our system of education, our common schools, our free ballot, our complete self government, our perfect freedom in religious opinions, they might perhaps have solved the question. Men of intelligence, possessed of perfect freedom of thought and action, having the right to elect their own rulers and law makers, and who are taught from childhood to yield obedience to law, have much of the material of which good and efficient soldiers are made.
     Of such were the soldiers who bore our victorious flag under the scorching rays of a tropical sun on every battle field from Vera Cruz to the capital of Mexico.
     Of that grand army that never knew a defeat, but very few are now among the living—fully one-fourth fell by Mexican bullets, or yielded to the diseases of the country, and now repose in graves in a foreign country, far from home and friends. Others more favored lived to reach their homes, but with health so shattered and constitution so enfeebled by sickness incurred in the service, that they, too, soon passed away. So that now, in this year, 1878, but about ten per cent, of that victorious army that astonished the world by its prowess and valor, remains with us. And time has begun to leave his marks upon them. The raven locks of former years are beginning to show the effect of the frosts of former Winters. They have been permitted by a kind Providence to live to see some of the results of their service and toil. They have seen State after State created from 630,000 square miles of territory acquired by our Government, as the result of the war to which their best years were devoted.
     They have lived to see the completion of the Pacific railroad, that great highway of the Nation, located on territory that would have belonged to a foreign country but for the strong arms and brave hearts of that gallant army of which they were a part. They have lived to see their country increase in population and wealth, and her flag respected and honored on sea and land the world over. While it has been their happy privilege to live and see so much that gives joy to the heart of the patriot, it has been their sad lot to see their own country bleeding from civil strife; to have looked upon their beloved Government while engaged in suppressing the terrible rebellion; to have seen their own homes drenched in blood, and the Government they had labored and toiled to sustain—the best Government that ever existed — struggling with terrible desperation of life, for the right simply to exist as a Nation. But it has been their happy lot, thank God, to see that contest ended, and the great question decided, whether we are a Nation or a confederacy of States [Applause], a partnership simply that may be dissolved at the will of one or two of the partners, or a permanent Union.
     There was a terrible loss of life and treasure before the decision was reached, but it came, and we are a Union —a grand Nation [Loud applause]. This meeting, today, is designed for a re-union of old comrades-in-arms; its object, social enjoyment, for old friends long separated here to meet and join hands, and renew the ties of friendship formed in years long past by perilous service in a common cause; to fight old battles over again, and to enjoy the few hours spent together as best you can. This is right and proper, and these re-unions should be, and, I trust, will be, of more frequent occurrence than in the past.
     May a kind heaven grant you, my comrades, the largest allowance of peace and happiness to the close of life; and may you all live to enjoy many such re-unions.

     General Ross was followed by General M. S. Barnes, of Galesburg, another Mexican veteran, in an address full of appropriateness to the occasion. He reviewed the action of Congress in refusing or neglecting to grant a pension to the heroes of that war, and characterized it as a meanness unbecoming the boasted philanthrophy and justice of the people of the American republic. He reviewed the marches and counter-marches of the little army, and the happy results achieved for the country.
     At the conclusion of this address, Captain R. W. Burt, master of ceremonies, rose and said:
Comrades, Citizens and Visitors:
     I am about to introduce to you a statesman whom two of the great States of the Union have honored with a seat in the United States Senate, and a soldier who has served his country with distinction, and received wounds in two wars — the first grand in its results, because it largely extended the area of freedom and greatly increased our national wealth; and the last glorious, because it preserved the Union and made every man within its bounds a freeman. Listen to the burning eloquence of a man who almost gave his life to conquer a foreign foe, and who, when the Union was in danger of being rent asunder, knew what colored coat to wear, and wore it with honor and distinction. I have the honor to introduce to you the honored statesman and heroic soldier,


MAJOR-GENERAL JAMES SHIELDS.


     The old hero was received with cheer after cheer. When quiet was restored, he said in response to the introductory remarks of Captain Burt and the greeting of the audience, that the crowd had heard so much eloquence that they would not care to listen to him. He was a little tired and had to speak in the evening, and besides, those cheers would have scared any body who could be scared at all. This was a glorious day for him and for them. He had received a rousing ovation from the people, and his heart was too full for him to say much. He and his war-worn comrades before him had eaten, drank and slept together on the hostile plains of Mexico. They had been baptized in blood and fire together. No other occasion would have brought him here, for he was worn out with the labors of the past few weeks. He had wanted to look his old comrades in the face and take them by the hand, and it would be perhaps the last time they would meet until the long roll summoned them all together again in another world. He alluded to the sufferings of the veterans of the Mexican war, and the apathy of Congress in recognizing them. The people were with them, if the politicians were not.
     In the evening a large audience assembled at Rouse's Hall to hear the speech of Gen. Shields upon the subject, "Reminiscences of the Mexican War." He entertained them well. His recollections of the war were abundant and well told. The General was an active participant in most of the scenes he described so vividly. Some of the incidents were heroic, others funny. The platform was filled with the veterans and their distinguished visitors from abroad. He was introduced to the audience, in a few appropriate remarks, by John Warner, Esq., mayor of the city.


DEATH OF GENERAL SHIELDS — ACTION OF THE ASSOCIATION.


     Intelligence of the death of General Shields was received in sorrow by the Association, and at a meeting held on the 6th of June, President Gardner in the chair, the following action was taken. Comrades Frazer and McKenzie were appointed a committee to draft resolutions expressive of the sorrow of the Association, at his sudden and unexpected taking off. After a brief absence the committee submitted the preamble and resolutions here appended:
    Whereas, It has pleased the Almighty to remove from our association General James Shields, therefore be it resolved,
    1. That the Society has, by his death, lost one who has always had the best interests of the society at heart, and who was always ready and willing to sacrifice his own comfort and interest in our behalf.
    2. That this nation and State, wherein he resided, have lost one of the purest and best patriots and statesmen by his death; one who, in the discharge of every known duty, was incorruptible, prompt and untiring in the discharge of his duties to his adopted country.
    3. That the colors of the association be lowered to half mast, and that the members of the association wear the usual badge of mourning for thirty days from this date as a token of our esteem for his nobleness of character and sorrow and regret over the demise of our former comrade.
    4. That a copy of these resolutions be transmitted to the family of our deceased comrade, and to each of the city papers, with the request that they publish the same.


LETTER FROM MRS. SHIELDS.


     In acknowledgment of the receipt of the resolutions above quoted, Mrs. Shields transmitted the accompanying letter:

                                                             Carrollton, Carroll Co., Mo., June 10,1879.
To the Central Illinois Association of Mexican Veterans:
        Esteemed friends — Your letter of resolutions were received, and please to accept my heartfelt gratitude for your kindness in forwarding them to me, and rest assured, dear friends I will prize them and preserve them for my poor little fatherless children.
        Accept my thanks and warmest wishes, and may God bless you, is the prayer of your sorrowing friend,
                        M. B. shields.

THE ROLL.


The following register embraces the names of the members of the association and a list of the names of visiting veterans on the occasion of the Grand Reunion on the 23d of May, 1878, with the companies and regiments to which they respectively belonged:

Capt. R. W. Burt.....................3d Ohio Inf.; Col. S. R. Curtis
Samuel O. White...............Co. A., 4th Ill. Vol. Inf.; Col. Baker
Thos. Shepherd......... Co. G., 4th Ill. Vol. Inf.; Col. E. D. Baker
John Drury............. Co. G , 4th Ill. Vol. Inf.; Col. E. D. Baker
John Hornbaker...........Co.G., 4th III. Vol. Inf.; Col. E. D. Baker
DeWitt C. Frazer....... Co. G., 4th Ill. Vol. Inf.; Col. E. D. Baker
Robert Sullivan......... Co. G.,4th Ill. Vol. Inf.; Col. E. D. Baker
John Morris............ Co. G., 4th Ill. Vol. Inf.; Col. E. D. Baker
Rob't Hale..............Co. G., 4th Ill. Vol. Inf.; Col. E. D. Baker
Gen. James Shields..................Honorary Member, Carrollton, Mo.
Valentine Werner............................Siege Train; Col. Hooker
S. M. Gutchess........................... Co. E., 6th Ill. Vol. Inf.
Henry Rehder.........................United States Navy; Capt. Woods
R.W. Gilliam........ ................................... Chillicothe
John Kobler......................................Co. B., 2d Mo. Cav.
Henry Wiltz.............................. Co. A., 4th Ohio Vol. Inf.
Wm. Schroeder..............................Co. I. 4th Ohio Vol. Inf.
John M. Guill..............................Co. A., 3d Ken. Vol. Inf. 
Granville James................................Co. C., 5th Ind. Inf.
———— Gray......................................Co. C., 5th Ind. Inf.
John Odenwitter................................Co. K., Mo. Vol. Inf.
James Bryant................................Co. H., Mounted Rifleman
Wm. B. Shaw....................................Co. H., 2d Penn. Vol.
Capt. Adam Stuber............................Col. I., 15th Ohio Vol.
Matthew Langston...............................Co. H., 1st Ill. Vol.
C. H. Washburne................................Co. G., 5th Ill. Vol.
Henry Heineke...................Co. B., 1st U. S. Drag.; Col. Sumner
George A. Wilkins, Major......................Co. S., 1st U. S. Inf.
D. W. Magee.. ............................Co. F., 1st Ind. Vol. Inf.
W, J. Gardner.............................Co. A., 1st Ohio Vol. Inf.
George Clark.............................Co. I., 9th Conn. Vol. Inf.
Miles Bosworth......................................................
Thos, H. Tamplin..............................Co. K., 1st U. S. Inf.
Henry Shofe................................Co. H., 2d Ohio Vol. Inf.
Henry Washhousen........................Co. B., 1st Mo. Mounted Vol.
Wm. Petefish......................................1st Ill. Vol. Inf.
John Dailey.................................Co. E, 3d U. S. Dragoons
C. McKenzie................................Co. A., 2d Ill. Vol. Inf.
Wm. A. Thornton...........................Co. A., 6th Ill. Vol. Inf.
Wm. Wickmire.............................Co. M., 1st U. S. Artillery
Henry Geszn...............................Co. E., 2d Penn. Vol. Inf.
Albert Ernst..................................Co. G., Mounted Rifles
Albion Epley..............................................Lawn Ridge
Darius Wiley...............................Co. D., 3d Ill. Vol. Inf.


VISITING VETERANS.


Major General James Shields.................Carrollton, Mo.
General Leonard F. Ross..............Avon, Fulton Co., Ill.
General M. S. Barnes........................Galesburg, Ill.
General N. Geersel.......................Mt. Pleasant, Iowa
Colonel Wm. J. Wyatt.............Franklin, Morgan Co., Ill. 
Captain Adam Stuber...................... Chillicothe, Ill.
Captain B. Warren..................Varna, Marshall Co. Ill.
Thos. Rhoads....................................Pekin, Ill.
Wm. Heldman............................Eldena, Lee Co. Ill.
Eli Lyon...........................Banner, Fulton Co., Ill.
Francis Putnam...................Hilton, Tazewell Co., Ill.
J. G. Hammer.....................................Pekin Ill.
Henry Heineke...................................Secor, Ill.
Edward Kane....................................Gridley,Ill.
John Drury...................Fon du Lac, Tazewell Co., Ill.
Madison Hughes.............Copperas Creek (or Canton), Ill. 
John B. Buehler......................................Kansas
Thos. Campbell...............................La Harpe, Ill.
Andrew J. Wells..........................Indianapolis, Ind.
Thos. Keenan.....................................Peru, Ill.
G. A. Wilkins..................................Dunlap, Ill.
W. B. Shaw................................Chillicothe, Ill.
J. Depew..................................Bloominglon, Ill.
W. A. Tinney....................................Pekin. Ill.
Chas. Cooper....................................Pekin, Ill.
Harvey Wilson.................................. Lacon, Ill.
Frederick Bulson...................Victoria, Knox Co., Ill.
John Ropler......................................Eaton, Mo.
John Brechbeller..........................Bloomington, Ill.
 


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Updated November 3, 2004

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